Elizabethan Era

The Tudors Era

Jacobean Era

Famous Sailors during Tudor Times



The whole of the Tudor period was a time of great exploration. At the beginning of this period it was the sailors from Spain and Portugal that were journeying the furthest, and making the most remarkable discoveries in the New World. It was during the reign of Elizabeth I that English sailors came into their own. They sought out new wealth and new opportunities, and were not afraid of a little plundering of foreign vessels.

Famous Tudor Explorers

The Elizabethan era was not short of heroes wanting to take to the high seas for the glory of queen and country. Elizabethan explorers found that there was no shortage of Tudor sailors willing to accompany them on their voyages of discovery. The most famous Tudor explorers are probably Sir Francis Drake and Sir Walter Raleigh, as these are the names most commonly found in the history books.

There were however many more successful English explorers of the time, such as Sir Humphrey Gilbert, Sir Richard Grenville and Sir John Hawkins as well as Sir Martin Frobisher and Sir Richard Hawkins. Also sailors like John Cabot, Sebastian Cabot and Henry Hudson; all of which made their name during this great time of discovery.

Famous Sailors in History

During this period in History, Spain was possibly the most powerful country in Europe. They certainly had the largest naval fleet and as such, no shortage of men willing to make their fortunes in the discovery of the New World and all of its treasures. Amongst the most famous of these men that sailed under the flag of Spain are Christopher Columbus, Hernando Cortez, Francisco Pizarro and Amerigo Vespucci, though the list is quite extensive. Other countries in Europe, such as Portugal, France and Italy were also sending out ships on voyages of discovery. They were captained by men such as Ferdinand Magellan, Vasco De Gama and Marco Polo.

Tudor Exploration

There were many reasons why the sailors of the time were willing take part in what would undoubtedly be a dangerous voyage. What drove them was the spirit of adventure that abounded at the time. There was also a great deal of money to be made out of a successful voyage. Not only was there the possibility of discovering a new land which could be claimed in the name of the queen, there was also the discovery of new foods and spices as well as precious stones, perfumes and medicines.

New and exotic woods and dyes could also be brought back to England, all of which would make money. Navigation was becoming easier with the introduction of the compass, allowing sailors to find their way in foggy conditions where the stars could not be seen to guide them. New maps had been made charting the newly discovered lands too which made navigation more straight forward. There was also the opportunity of discovering something so great, that it could be named after the captain of the ship that lead that specific voyage of discovery.


   
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